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Bank of America CEO

Our mission to help you navigate the new normal is fueled by subscribers. To enjoy unlimited access to our journalism, subscribe today. Business has been measuring shareholder returns via earnings reports and changes in stock price for what seems like forever. But now that stakeholder capitalism is in vogue, corporations need new metrics.

Enter Brian Moynihan, Bank of America's CEO of 10 years and the latest guest on Fortune podcast "Leadership Next." As chair of the International Business Council (IBC), he is working to figure out a set of common metrics the business community can use to measure the stakeholder capitalism that the Business Roundtable endorsed last year. And despite the pandemic, the group is getting closer to determining that final list of metrics and sub-metrics.

You've had a pandemic and an economic crisis around that pandemic, but at the same time, we have more people signing onto the metrics, we have more dialogues, and the green part of this has gotten completely embedded into the recovery question, Moynihan said of interest in stakeholder capitalism despite the recession.

To ensure that interest translates into widespread use of the metrics, the IBC has been focusing on finding "the best-of-the-best metrics" that allow for results that companies can easily calculate and disclose. Moynihan said that the consistency and accountability these disclosed results provide will be key, because society's problems can't be solved without private industry.

In the remainder of the interview, host Alan Murray asks Moynihan about his stance on ever-increasing CEO pay, purpose-driven leadership at Bank of America, and the bank's enormous commitment of $300 billion over the next decade to environmentally friendly business.

In recent years, new leaders have emerged across the United States to champion rights - not just for African Americans, but also in the fields of migration and gender. They are using politics, social media campaigns and publishing in new ways to amplify and spread their messages. Here are 21 current and emerging civil rights leaders who will shape struggles in the United States and the wider world for years to come.

Los-Angeles-based Khan-Cullors describes herself as an “artist, organizer and freedom fighter”. She is best-known for Black Lives Matter (BLM), the African American rights protest movement she co-founded following the killing of black teenager Trayvon Martin in 2012. This year, BLM has surged following the death of George Floyd. In fact it “may be the largest movement in US history,” writes the New York Times. Khan-Cullors is also an influential LGBTQ activist and a leading voice for prison reform – and abolition.